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A Bridge Towards Knowledge

901101 Engineering Workshops                                      (1 Credit Hour)

Pre-requisite: N/A

  • This course covers the fundamentals of safety procedures followed and tools used inside workshops, Fundamentals of metal and welding, and Carpentry workshops.
  • Topics include: Safety Procedures and tools Inside the Workshops, Introduction to Timber and Metals; their forms and properties. Introduction to different tools and machinery used in Metal and welding and Carpentry workshops, Basics of Manufacturing in Fields of Sheet Metal fabrication, Welding Types and Processes, and carpentry.  Students will work as individuals and in team work.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Be aware of safety procedures and tools used inside the workshops.
    • Gain good knowledge on forms and properties of timber and metals.
    • Operate different machineries and use different tools found in metal and welding and carpentry workshops.

901102 Computer Aided Engineering Drawing              (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 9600101 Computer Skills

  • This course covers the fundamentals of engineering drawings, and foundation in computer aided design.
  • Introduction to engineering graphics as a means of communication in the technical fields, Engineering Drawing Terms and Description, Engineering Drawing Equipment, Line types and their meanings Geometric Drawing, Orthographic Projections, Section Views, Isometric Perspectives, Perspective sketching, Introduction to AutoCAD, Drawing Commands in AutoCAD, Modifying Commands in AutoCAD, Geometric Construction in AutoCAD.
  • At the end of the course, students should be able to: 
    • Create freehand sketching and lettering.
    • Give dimensions on the drawings.
    • Draw views and sections of different objects.
    • Draw 3-D objects.
    • Sketch the 2-D drawings in AutoCAD.

901200 Engineering Mathematics                                  (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 103102 Calculus (2)

  • This course covers the concepts, principles, and mathematical techniques commonly used in modern engineering modeling.
  • Topics include: First-order differential equations, linear second-order differential equations, higher order linear differential equations, Laplace transforms, Fourier series, partial differential equations, mathematical modeling.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Define and explain the basic concepts of mathematical modeling.
    • Formulate models of natural phenomena using differential equations
    • Solve a variety of differential equations analytically.
    • Utilize appropriate techniques such as Laplace transformation and Fourier series.

901203 Engineering Ethics                                               (1 Credit Hour)

Prer-requisite: N/A

  • This course covers the concepts, principles, and mathematical techniques commonly used in modern engineering moThis course introduces junior engineering students to definition of engineering profession and recognize ethical and professional responsibilities of engineering.
  • Topics include: Introduction to engineering profession, best engineering practices, the role of the engineers in society, regulations that govern the engineering profession locally and globally, research Integrity, intellectual property rights, engineering and sustainability.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Understand and become aware of laws and regulations related to engineering profession.
    • Analyze situations with the studied ethical theory.
    • Apply ethical principles and commit to professional ethics and responsibilities and norms of engineering practice.

901373 Management & Engineering Economy              (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 103102 Calculus (2)

  • This course covers the concepts, principles, and techniques involved in decision-making between alternatives encountered in engineering projects.

  • Topics include: Introduction to management, major elements of feasibility studies. Principles of engineering Economy. Equivalence and compound interest formula. Single payment model. Uniform payment model. Gradient payment model. Exponential payment model. Decision criteria for single and multiple alternatives: present worth, annual worth, future worth, and internal rate of return, benefit cost ratio, and payback methods.

  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:

    • Define and explain the basic concepts of contemporary issues of management.

    • Explain the impact of engineering solutions in an economic context.

    • Develop cash flow diagram for engineering solutions alternatives and evaluate their economic feasibility.

    • Apply interest equations to equivalence calculations.

103231 Principles of Statistics                                       (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 103101 Calculus (1)

  • This course covers the Introduction to statistics; Descriptive statistics; Measures of centrality and variation; Percentiles; Chebyshev's inequality and empirical rules; Introduction to probability; Probability laws; Counting rules, conditional probability and independence of events; Discrete and continuous random variables; Probability distribution; Expected and standard deviation of random variable; Binomial and normal probability distribution; Sampling distributions; Estimation and test of hypotheses.

103241 Linear Algebra (1)                                             (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 103101 Calculus (1)

  • This course covers System of linear equations. Matrices and matrix inverses, Row echelon forms. Determinants and Cramer Rule. Vector spaces and subspaces. Basis and orthogonal basis. Linear Transformations. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors.

103373 Numerical Analysis (1)                                      (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 103102 Calculus (2) + 601115 Programming for Engineers

  • This course covers Taylor's Theorem and its applications. Errors. Root findings. Solving systems of linear equations numerically. Interpolation. Numerical differentiation and integration. Discrete Least Squares Approximation.

901201 Material Science                                                 (3 Credit Hours)

Co-requisite: 101108 General Chemistry Laboratory

  • This course covers the fundamental concepts of Material Science.
  • Topics include: Materials science and engineering. Materials that changed the world; Metals, Ceramics, Optical fibers and Glasses, Polymers, Composites, and semiconductors. The Atomic Bonding; Atomic Structure, The Ionic Bond, The Covalent Bond, The Metallic Bond, The Secondary or van der Waals Bond, Material Classification according to their type of bond. Crystalline Structure; Systems and Lattices, Metal Structures, Ceramic Structures, Polymer Structures, Semiconductor Structures, Lattice Positions, Directions and Planes. Mechanical Behavior; Stress versus strain, Elastic Deformation, Plastic Deformation Hardness, Creep and Stress Relaxation, Viscoelastic Deformation.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Be familiar with different types of materials.
    • Be familiar with types of bonding and how a material can be classified according to its atomic bond type.
    • Be familiar with the crystalline structures of different materials.
    • Be familiar with the mechanical behavior of different materials.
    • Be familiar with the behavior of visco-elastic materials.

901204 (901261) Engineering Surveying                      (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 103101 Calculus (1)

  • This course covers the fundamental principles of engineering surveying.
  • Topics include: Introduction, Principles of Surveying, Distance Measurements, Theory of Errors, Precision and Accuracy, Leveling, Topographic (Contour) survey, Area and Volume, Angle Measurements, Coordinate Geometry, Travers Survey, Total Station and its applications.
  • At the end of the course, students should be able to:
    • Be familiar with different types of surveying's.
    • Learn different methods and tools used in distance measurements.
    • Learn the theory of errors and methods of minimizing and correcting errors.
    • Be able to compute elevations by applying different leveling procedures.
    • Be able to produce contour maps.
    • Learn how to calculate areas and volumes, thus compute the cut and fill volumes that are related to earth works.
    • Be able to measure horizontal and vertical angles.
    • Be able to perform traversing and all related computations.
    • Be familiar with operating the Total Station.

901205 (901262) Engineering Surveying Laboratory     (1 Credit Hour)

Co-requisite: 901204 (901261) Engineering Surveying

  • This course covers the fundamentals of field practice on engineering surveying tools and instruments.
  • Topics include: Exercises on Tools and instruments used in Distance Measurement such as; pace, Tapes, Electronic meters, and EDMs. Exercises on Levels, Theodolites, and Total Stations. Field Applications Include; Pacing and Taping, Distance measurements, Leveling and Topographic (Contour) Surveys, Traversing (Directions and Angle Measurements). Exercises on GPS instruments.
  • At the end of the course, students should be able to:
    • Use different surveying tools and instruments in Engineering surveying field applications.

901211 Statics                                                                 (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 103102 Calculus (2) + 104101 General Physics (1)

  • This course covers the fundamental concepts of engineering mechanics.
  • Topics include: Principles of mechanics; Concurrent force systems; Statics of particles; Equivalent force/moment systems; Centroids and center of gravity; Equilibrium of rigid bodies; trusses, frames, and machines; Internal forces in structural members; Friction; Second moments of areas.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Determine the components/resultant of a system of forces.
    • Draw free body diagrams, write down equilibrium equations, determine reactions, and calculate the internal forces in structural elements.
    • Locate the centroid of an area and calculate the second moment of an area.

901214 Dynamics                                                            (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 901211 Statics

  • This course covers introduction to dynamics; kinematics of particles; Kinetics of particles, force and acceleration; Work and energy methods; Impulse and momentum.
  • Topics include rectilinear and curvilinear motion of particles; The concept of constrained and relative motion; Work and energy concept; Linear and angular momentum; Plane kinematics and kinetics of rigid bodies.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Determine the difference between statics and dynamics principles.
    • Determine the difference between rectilinear and curvilinear motion of particles.
    • Determine the concept of constrained and relative motion.
    • Determine the concept of work and energy.
    • Determine the difference between linear and angular momentum.

901221 Engineering Geology                                          (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 101103 General Chemistry

  • This course covers: Fundamental materials to the nature of the earth, and a general idea to the components of the earth's crust that are used in various industrial fields. It also deals with some natural phenomena that occur inside and on the earth's surface and study their relationship to structural design. In general, this course is an introduction to other engineering courses such as geotechnical engineering, foundation engineering, and engineering hydrology.
  • Topics include: Introduction to geology, minerals and rocks, surface sediments, structural geology, ground water, rock characteristics and classification, use of rocks for engineering purposes, site investigations, practical applications.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Enlighten the significance of understanding geology, formations, material properties, geological/geotechnical explorations and properties of rocks and soils.

901232 Strength of Materials                                         (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 901211 Statics

  • This course covers the fundamental concepts of mechanics of materials.
  • Topics include: Concepts of stress and strain; Mechanical properties of materials; Stresses and displacements of axially loaded members, tensile tests; Normal, bending, shear, and torsional stresses and strains; Combined stresses; Composite cross-sections; Deflections, Integration Method; Buckling of columns.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Solve for stresses and deformations in members of structures and machine elements.
    • Calculate combined stresses to find maximum tensile, compressive, and shear stresses in an element in design of machine components and structures.
    • Transform stresses and strains from one orientation to another and draw the Mohr circle.

901233 Materials Laboratory                                           (1 Credit Hour)

Co-requisite: 901232 Strength of Materials

  • This course covers the fundamental concepts of mechanics of materials.
  • Topics include: Tensile test, buckling test, stiffness test, beam bending test, impact test, hardness test, trusses, suspended bridges.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Perform different destructive testing on different types of materials.
    • Understanding of relationship between the material properties and the load response.

901241 Highway Engineering                                         (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 901204 (901261) Engineering Surveying

  • This course covers the fundamental principles of highway geometric design and earth works.
  • Topics Include: Principles of Highway Location, Factors Affecting the Geometric Design of Highways; (Human, Vehicle, and Road Characteristics), Highway Classification, Types of Vertical and Horizontal Curves, Setting Out of Vertical and Horizontal Curves, Design of the Vertical and Horizontal Alignments, Application of Super-elevation on Horizontal Curves, Combining the Vertical and Horizontal Alignments, Earthworks; cut and fill volumes, volume sheet and the mass haul diagram.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Understand and consider the factors that affect the selection of the highway location in the selection of the rout location.
    • Take into consideration the human, vehicle and road characteristics in the geometric design of the highway.
    • Know all types of vertical and horizontal curves.
    • Make a full geometric design to both vertical and horizontal alignments including the application of super-elevation on the horizontal alignment.
    • Calculate areas, volumes, construct the volume sheet, and draw the mass haul diagram.

901302 Civil Engineering Drawing                                   (1 Credit Hour)

Pre-requisite: 901102 Computer Aided Engineering Drawing

  • This course covers the fundamentals of civil engineering drawings using Autodesk Revit.
  • Topics include: Autodesk Revit: Symbols used in Civil Engineering drawing: Doors, Windows and Staircases Drawings. Comprehensive Drawing of Residential building, (Layout, plan, elevation and sectional elevation). Preparation of Layout planning for different Civil Engineering Projects. Preparation of layout plan/Maps and building drawing.
  • At the end of the course, students should be able to:
    • Know symbols used in civil engineering drawings.
    • Draw different views and take sections in windows, doors and staircases.
    • Draw layout, plans and sections of residential buildings and different civil engineering project views.

901313 Fluid Mechanics                                                  (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 901200 Engineering Mathematics + 901211 Statics

  • This course covers the fundamental concepts, principles, and techniques related to fluid mechanics.
  • Topics include: Fluid properties, fluid statics, pressure and its measurements, forces on plane and curved submerged surfaces, buoyancy & floatation. Fluids in motion, flow kinematics and visualization. Basic control volume approach, differential and integral continuity equation. Pressure variation in flowing fluids. Euler's and Bernoulli's equations. Momentum principle and its applications. Energy equation, Hydraulic and energy grade lines dimensional analysis and similitude. Surface resistance and introduction to boundary layer theory. Flow in conduits, laminar and turbulent flows, frictional and minor losses, piping systems.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Define and explain the basic properties that govern fluid's behavior.
    • Apply relevant equations related to static and dynamic fluids.
    • Identify different areas of application of fluid mechanics.

901323 Geotechnical Engineering                                  (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 901221 Engineering Geology

  • This course covers the fundamental concepts of soil mechanics and geotechnical engineering.
  • Topics include: Composition and structure of soil; Engineering Characteristics of Soil; Plasticity of Soils (liquid limit, plastic limit and plasticity index); Soil Classification (AASHTO soil classification and Unified soil classification); Soil compaction and the optimum moisture content; Water flow in soils (seepage); Stresses in soils; Compressibility behavior and properties of soils; consolidation and settlement analysis; Shear strength of soils; Experimental measurements.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Classify soils according to different soil classification systems.
    • Understand the phase relationships (volumetric and gravity relationships) within soils.
    • Understand the moisture density relationship and its importance for field compaction.
    • Understand soil shear strength and compressibility (elastic and long-term settlements).

901326 Geotechnical Engineering Laboratory                 (1 Credit Hour)

Co-requisite: 901323 Geotechnical Engineering

  • This course covers the most common laboratory tests used in geotechnical engineering practice that describing the physical and mechanical nature of soils.
  • Topics include: Soils Visual Description, Moisture Content, Sieve Analyses, Hydrometer Analyses, Atterberg Limits, Soil Compaction, Field Density- Sand Cone Method, Permeability: Constant Head and Falling Head, Consolidation Test, Direct Shear Test, Unconfined and Triaxial Test.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Perform different procedures in soil testing.
    • Evaluate and interpret tests results.
    • Solving some geotechnical engineering problems.

901331 Building Materials                                              (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 101103 General Chemistry

  • This course provides an overview of basic properties and interactions of hydraulic cements and mineral aggregates in concrete.
  • Topics include cement (types, manufacture, properties and hydration), aggregates, fresh concrete, hardened concrete (strength, strength development, shrinkage, creep), durability, mix design by ACI. Properties of plastic and hardened concrete and modifications using admixtures. Also addressed are handling, and placement problems.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Learn about the process of cement manufacturing and the purpose use of different types of cements.
    • Learn about different classifications of mineral aggregates, and their physical properties of relevance to concrete's hardened properties and durability.
    • Design concrete mixtures for required fresh and hardened behavior
    • Understanding of relationship between material properties and structural form.

901332 Building Materials Laboratory                             (1 Credit Hour)

Co-requisite: 901333 Building Materials

  • This course provides an overview of basic properties and interactions of hydraulic cements and mineral aggregates in concrete.
  • Topics include cement, aggregate tests, fresh and hardened concrete testing, non-destructive tests, design & testing of concrete mixes.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Perform the experimental procedures for testing fine and coarse aggregate.
    • Perform the experimental procedures of testing cement paste (mortar) and concrete in fresh and hardened states.

901333 Structural Analysis (1)                                      (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 901232 Strength of Materials

  • This course covers the fundamental concepts of structural analysis.
  • Topics include: Structural forms and types of supports; Stability and determinacy; Determinate structures: trusses, beams, and frames, Shear and moment diagrams for beams and frames, Three hinged arches, Influence lines for beams and trusses (Muller-Breslau principle), Deflection methods: direct integration, moment area theorems, conjugate beams, virtual work, least work.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Draw free body diagrams, determine reactions and internal forces in statically determinate trusses, beams, arches, and frames.
    • Draw the shear force and bending moment diagrams for beams and frames.
    • Able to use the theorems of structures to obtain deflections and rotations.
    • An ability to compare then distinguish the best method/alternative to determine rotation and deflection of a given statically determinate structure.

901334 (901433) Structural Analysis (2)                      (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 901333 Structural Analysis (1)

Co-requisite: 103373 Numerical Analysis (1)

  • This course covers the additional concepts of structural analysis.
  • Topics include: Indeterminate structures; Static and kinematic indeterminacies; Force methods of analysis: Consistent deformations, Least Work; Misalignment and temperature effects; Displacement methods of analysis: Slope deflection, Moment distribution; Influence lines of continuous beams, Introduction to matrix structural analysis.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Use the force methods of analysis to solve statically indeterminate trusses, beams, frames and composite structures.
    • Use the displacement methods of analysis to solve statically indeterminate beams and, frames.
    • An ability to compare then distinguish the best method/alternative to solve a certain/given statically indeterminate structure.

901355 (901353) Hydraulics and Hydrology                 (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 901313 Fluid Mechanics

  • This course covers the fundamental concepts, principles, and techniques related hydraulics engineering and builds on the concepts learned during fluid mechanics course.
  • Topics include: Flow and hydrostatic forces, classification of flow, pressurized pipe flow, pipe flow in simple networks, open channels flow, specific energy, momentum and specific force, Manning's equations, hydraulic jump, turbulent flow in open channels, steady, gradually and rapidly varied flow, hydraulic machines.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Identify major and minor losses in a piping system.
    • Estimate the head losses in piping system.
    • Apply appropriate common equation of pipe and open channel flow.
    • Be able to select appropriate pumps for a giving hydraulic system.

901354 Hydraulics Laboratory                                         (1 Credit Hour)

Co-requisite: 901355 (901353) Hydraulics and Hydrology

  • This course builds on the concepts learned during fluid mechanics and hydraulics courses and covers a wide range of relevant experiments.
  • Topics include: Center of pressure on a plane surface, stability of a floating bodies, Venturi and orifice meters, impact of jets, flow over a rectangular notch, flow over a weir, head loss through pipes, critical depth and specific energy, flow under a sluice gate, roughness of open channel, hydraulic jump, performance of impulse and reaction turbines, performance characteristics of a centrifugal pump, water hammer, properties of fluids.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Conduct different types of fluid mechanics and hydraulics experiments.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of experimental procedures used to characterize different types of flow and hydraulics system.

901400 Technical Writing                                               (2 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 70 CH + 9400123 (9400121) Communication Skills in English (1)

  • This course covers the fundamentals of effective individual and collaborative technical writing (including the planning, drafting, and revising stages).
  • Topics include writing letters and memorandums, reports, e-mail, and other documents using standard research techniques, documentation, and formatting.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Be effective technical communicators in the context of the engineering academic and professional environments.

901424 Foundations Design                                           (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 901323 Geotechnical Engineering + 901435 Reinforced Concrete (1)

  • This course covers the principles of foundations design.
  • Topics include: the bearing capacity of shallow foundation, distribution of stresses in soils, settlement of shallow foundation, factors to be considered in foundation design, introduction to deep foundation, as well as lateral earth pressures and retaining walls.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Understand the different types of foundations and the foundation selection criteria.
    • Determine the bearing capacity of different foundation types.
    • Perform geotechnical design of different foundation types.
    • Predict the foundation settlements.

901435 Reinforced Concrete (1)                                    (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 901331 Building Materials + 901333 Structural Analysis (1)

  • This course covers the fundamental concepts of reinforced concrete (RC) analysis and design.
  • Topics include: Properties of concrete and reinforcing steel; The ACI Building Code Requirements; Flexural analysis: Equivalent stress block, Ultimate strength design, Design and detailing of singly and doubly reinforced beams, Design of rectangular and flanged beam cross-sections; Shear and diagonal tension in beams; Bond, anchorage and development length; Design and detailing of one-way slab systems; Serviceability of beams and one-way slabs.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Analyze/design various beam cross-sections for bending, shear, bond, and deflections.
    • Analyze/design one-way slab systems.
    • Prepare structural detailing for beams and slabs.

901437 Reinforced Concrete (2)                                    (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 901435 Reinforced Concrete (1)

  • This course covers additional concepts of reinforced concrete (RC) analysis and design.
  • Topics include: Design of columns: Structural analysis and design of concentric and eccentric short columns, Interaction diagrams, Analysis and design of columns subjected to biaxial bending, Analysis and design of long columns and classifications of column joints in frame structures; Design of two-way slabs with and without beams to resist moments and shear forces; Design of foundations to resist bending and shear forces; Detailing of reinforcement; Design of beams for torsion.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Analyze/design RC columns.
    • Analyze/design two-way slab systems, wall and spread footings.
    • Prepare structural detailing for columns, slabs, and footings.

901438 (901537) Steel Structures                                 (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-req: 901334 (901433) Structural Analysis (2)

  • This course covers the fundamental concepts of structural steel design.
  • Topics include: Properties of structural steel, Loads and load combinations, AISC manual load and resistance factor design (LRFD), Design of tension members, Design of compression elements, Design of beams, Design of beam-column elements, Simple welded or bolted connections.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Know how to effectively use the AISC manual in analysis and design.
    • Design of tension members, compression members, beams, and beam columns.
    • Design simple welded and bolted connections.

901442 Pavement Design                                               (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 901241 Highway Engineering

  • This course covers the fundamental principles of highway pavements, pavement construction, mix design, pavement design, and pavement management and rehabilitation.
  • Topics include: Types of highway pavements: Rigid and flexible pavements. Materials used in pavement construction: asphalt binders, aggregates, and subgrade soils. Field procedure and tests for pavement construction Mix design: Marshall mx design procedure and the Super-pave system. Design of flexible pavements; the AASHTO design method. Pavement maintenance and rehabilitation: types of distresses in flexible pavements, road surface evaluation, strategies followed in pavement rehabilitation.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Learn the difference between the rigid and flexible pavements.
    • Identify types and characteristics of materials used in the construction of flexible and rigid pavements and to ascertain their suitability for use in highway construction.
    • Classify different types of subgrade soils and to ascertain their suitability for use in highway subgrade and subbase construction.
    • Learn the field procedure and test in pavement construction.
    • Understand the Marshall and the Superpave mix design procedures.
    • Understand the AASHTO design method for flexible and rigid pavements.
    • Be familiar with different types of pavement distresses and major issues in pavement management and rehabilitation.

901443 Highway paving Materials Laboratory                (1 Credit Hour)

Co-requisite: 901442 Pavement Design

  • This course covers the tests conducted on bituminous materials, mix design procedures quality control of asphalt mixtures, highway surface texture measurements and the CBR test.
  • Topics include: Consistency tests; Penetration, Ductility, Softening Point (Ring and Ball), and Viscosity. Safety tests; Flash and fire point. Marshal Mix design procedure. Quality control tests; Asphalt content by ignition. Tests related to Super-pave system; Angularity of course aggregates, angularity of fine aggregate, Sand equivalent test. Skid resistance by British Pendulum. Mean Texture Depth Measurement.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Conduct consistency tests.
    • Prepare and test specimens for the Marshalls' mix design procedure.
    • Conduct quality control on hot mix asphalts (HMA).
    • Measure skid resistance and calculate mean texture depth of a highway surface.

901445 Traffic and Transportation Engineering            (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 103231 Principles of Statistics + 901241 Highway Engineering

  • This course covers the fundamental principles of traffic and transportation engineering.
  • Topics include: Traffic Engineering Studies, Fundamental Principles of Traffic Flow, Types of Intersections, Intersection Design and Control, Capacity and Level of Service for basic Highway Segments. Introduction to Transportation Engineering, Importance of Transportation, Transportation Systems, Public Transit Capacity and Level of Service.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Learn and understand analyzing spot speed, traffic volume, travel time and delay, and, parking data.
    • Become familiar with different elements of traffic flow, understand the relationships among the different elements of traffic flow, and become familiar with the fundamental diagram of traffic flow.
    • Understand the macroscopic traffic models.
    • Become familiar with the different at-grade and grade-separated intersections.
    • Learn how and when to apply different types of at-grade intersection control systems.
    • Learn how to use the HCM procedure to determine the LOS of uniform road segments, and become familiar with highway capacity terminology and definitions.
    • Be familiar with importance and advantages of different transportation systems.
    • Become familiar with public transportation modes, their capacity, and their service attributes.

901453 Wastewater Treatment Engineering                 (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 901355 (901353) Hydraulics and Hydrology

  • This course covers the fundamental concepts, principles, and techniques related water and wastewater engineering.
  • Topics include: Water and wastewater sources, different stages of treatment processes, sludge handling, design of water and wastewater treatment plant, reactor theory and modeling, process kinetics, chemical, physical and biological treatment, hydraulic of distribution networks of drinking water and collection systems of wastewater.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Perform calculations related to water and wastewater chemistry and kinetics.
    • Identify pollutants and select appropriate treatment units.
    • Apply design equation to size different types of treatment units.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of hydraulics principles that govern distribution and collection networks.

901454 Wastewater Treatment Engineering Laboratory (1 Credit Hour)

Co-requisite: 901453 Wastewater Treatment Engineering

  • This course builds on the concepts learned during wastewater engineering course and covers a wide range of water and wastewater quality tests.
  • Topics include: Water and Wastewater analysis: acidity, alkalinity, chloride, hardness, Ammonia, dissolved oxygen; biochemical oxygen demand, chemical oxygen demand, coliform bacteria, solids determination, coagulation, softening, electrical conductivity, turbidity, ph, and Buchner filtration test.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Conduct different types of water and wastewater analysis test.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of experimental procedures used to evaluate water and wastewater quality characteristics.

901456 Environmental Engineering                               (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 101103 General Chemistry + 901355 (901353) Hydraulics and Hydrology

  • This course focuses on the integration of science and engineering principles to improve the natural environment and provide healthy water, air, and land for habitation.
  • Topics include: Introduction to environmental engineering, Materials and energy balances, Environmental risk measurements, Water Resources and Quality, Water Pollution Modeling, Control and Prevention, Air Quality, Air Pollution Modeling, Control and Prevention, Solid Waste Management, Three R's, Noise Pollution and Reduction, EIA.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Identify the causes of environmental problems.
    • Understand and become aware of principles, laws and regulations related to environment.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of engineering solutions in an environmental context.

901471 Construction Project Management                    (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 901373 Management & Engineering Economy

  • This course covers the fundamental concepts in construction project management.
  • Topics include: Construction Project: Cost Management, Quality Management, Safety Management, Human Resource Management, Planning and Scheduling, Monitoring and Controlling of Performance.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Define and explain the basic concepts of construction projects.
    • Perform cost analysis, develop estimates and schedules.
    • Identify and mitigate construction safety hazards.
    • Explain how to enforce quality.

901497 (901597) Engineering Field Training                (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 115 CHs.

  • The student should be a full-time trainee covering 320 working hours, and follow the instructions prescribed by the Department Council.

901571 Specifications, Contracts and Quantity Survey (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 901302 Civil Engineering Drawing + 901435 Reinforced Concrete (1)

  • This course covers the different construction contracts systems, different types of specifications and introduction of Quantity Surveying.
  • Topics include: Introduction to construction contracts and specifications, FIDIC conditions of contract for construction and Quantity Surveying.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Explain the different construction contracts administration system.
    • Define the legal aspects of contract documents.
    • Explain the different types of drawings and specifications.
    • Define the owner-engineer-constructor relationships and responsibilities.
    • Bids and contract performance.
    • Develop the skills to define the business organizations.
    • Understand ethics and professionalism.
    • Understand Quantity Surveying and the calculation procedures for it.

901598 Graduation Project (1)                                        (1 Credit Hour)

Pre-requisite: 120 CHs. + 901497 Engineering Field Training

Co-requisite: 901400 Technical Writing

901599 Graduation Project (2)                                      (2 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 901598 Graduation Project (1)

901501 Computer Applications in Civil Engineering      (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: Dep. Approval

  • This course provides the students with training on using one or more of the engineering programs used in civil engineering industry.
  • Topics include: Structural engineering applications, geotechnical, highways and transportation, water and environmental.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Use the computer program to model real life civil engineering problems.
    • Provide report/documentation of technical outcomes and detailing of the civil engineering problem.
    • Apply the skills learned in this course in graduation projects.

901532 Reinforced Concrete (3)                                    (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 901437 Reinforced Concrete (2)

  • This course covers the fundamentals topics in earthquake engineering.
  • Topics include: Fundamental understanding of seismic analysis, Behavior and design of reinforced concrete structures in terms of materials, components and structural systems, according to the current code requirements. Basic understanding of computational modeling.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Define and explain the basic definitions of earthquake engineering.
    • Calculate the seismic loads and their distribution within the chosen structural system.
    • Design structural components to adequately carry these seismic forces.
    • Provide dimensional and reinforcement detailing of the design elements.

901533 Advanced Steel Structures                                (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 901438 (901537) Steel Structures

  • This course covers additional concept of structural steel design.
  • Topics include: Introduction to bolted connections: bolts subject to concentric and eccentric loading; Welded connections: welds subjected to concentric and eccentric loading; Shear connections; Moment connections; Beam and column splices; Base plates; Plate girders; Composite cross-sections.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Design bolted and welded connections not considered in the previous steel design course.
    • Understand and apply the AISC Manual provisions for the design of plate girders.
    • Implement the accumulated knowledge in steel design in a term project that involves the design of various structural elements and their connections.

901534 Pre-stressed Concrete                                       (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 901435 Reinforced Concrete (1)

  • This course covers the fundamental concepts of prestressed and posttensioned concrete members.
  • Topics include: Basic principles, Short- and long-term properties of concrete and prestressing tendons, Prestress losses, Flexural behavior, Analysis and design of prestressed concrete beams: pretensioned, post-tensioned, Service and strength design, Strain limits, Anchorage zone design, Shear and diagonal tension, Composite cross sections: design and construction, Deflection calculations.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Calculate step by step and lump sum prestress losses.
    • Design prestressed and posttensioned beams to carry service loads, ultimate loads, and shear forces.
    • Calculate the deflections of prestressed concrete girders.

901535 Earth Retaining Structures                                (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 901424 Foundation Design

  • This course covers the fundamental concepts of earth retaining structures.
  • Topics include: Revision for foundation design, lateral earth pressure, gravity reinforced concrete retaining walls, non-gravity retaining wall (soldier piles, sheet piles and secant pile walls), anchored wall reinforced soils, and mechanically stabilized earth walls.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Understand the different types of wall.
    • Understand the wall type selection criteria.
    • Understand design requirements and procedures for different types of walls.
    • Calculate the stresses within the different types or walls.
    • Perform geotechnical design calculations for different types of walls.

901536 Bridge Design                                                     (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 901437 Reinforced Concrete (2) + 901438 (901531) Steel Structures

  • This course covers the fundamental concepts of bridge design.
  • Topics include: Types of bridges; material properties; loads on bridges; design of bridge slabs; design of reinforced concrete bridges; design of pre-stressed concrete bridges; design of steel concrete bridges.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Calculate the applied loads expected to affect bridge performance.
    • Design short and medium span bridges taking into account the structural strength, service life, and durability.
    • Provide structural detailing of various bridge superstructure elements.

901543 Airport and Railways Engineering                     (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 901241 Highway Engineering

  • This course covers the fundamentals of Railway and Airport Engineering.
  • This course is divided into two main subjects, those are: Railway and Airport Engineering. In the railway engineering, topics include: Introduction to Railway engineering; elements of railway engineering, the track or permanent way (rails, sleepers, fittings and fastenings, ballast, and the formation). Geometric design of the railway tracks: gradients and grade compensation, horizontal alignment of the track, transition curves, vertical alignment of the track, conning of wheels, widening of the gage.  While in the Airport Engineering part topics include: Introduction to airport engineering: air traffic services, regulation and policies, the ICAO and the airport structure (land side and airside). The Aircraft characteristics related to airport design: physical dimensions, performance characteristics and aircraft weight and gear configuration. Runways: runways configurations, runways orientation and the wind rose, estimating runways lengths, runway system geometric specifications.
  • At the end of the course, students should be able to:
    • Select different Railway elements such as: Track gauges, Track, Rails, Sleepers, Ballast.
    • Perform the engineering surveys required for the construction of a new route.
    • Make horizontal and vertical design of the rout alignment.
    • Understand the effect of different aircraft characteristics on the planning and design of airports.
    • Be able to obtain the runway orientation by using data and applying the wind rose.
    • Perform geometric design of the runways.

901544 Urban Transportation Planning                         (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 901445 Traffic and Transportation Engineering

  • This course covers the fundamental principles of Transportation Planning in Urban Areas.
  • Topics include: Modes of transportation and Comparative advantages. The Transportation Planning Process, Basic Elements of Transportation Planning, Urban Transportation Planning, Forecasting Travel and Travel Demand, Trip Generation, Trip Distribution, Mode Choice, Traffic Assignment, Evaluating transportation alternatives.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Differentiate between different modes of transportation and the comparative advantage between them.
    • Select a transportation mode.
    • Apply the seven basic elements in transportation planning process.
    • Plan the relocation of a rural or an urban road.
    • Evaluate alternatives and chose a project.
    • Perform Traffic Demand Forecasting, and assign traffic.

901549 Advanced Topics in Traffic and Transportation Engineering (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 901445 Traffic and Transportation Engineering

  • This course covers selective advanced topics in transportation and traffic Engineering.
  • Topics include: Design of drainage systems; design of parking facilities; design of highway interchanges; roadway lighting; highway feasibility studies.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Design drainage systems for highways.
    • Design parking facilities including on-street parking and off-street parking facilities.
    • Provide understanding on how to design highway interchanges.
    • Provide understanding on roadway lighting.
    • Understand how to conduct highway feasibility studies.

901551 Environmental Impact Assessment                  (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 901456 Environmental Engineering

  • This course covers the fundamental concepts, principles, and techniques related environmental impacts assessments.
  • Topics include: Sustainability and Environmental Impact Assessment Overview, environmental assessment as required and outlined by the Jordan's Environment protection law, Public Participation in the EIA process, Description of existing environment, baseline conditions, Methods for impact identification and prediction, Jordan's EIA Process, Description of EIA Impacts (Social, Economic, Noise, Landscape, Traffic, Cultural, Air, Soil, Surface and Groundwater, Biodiversity and Human Health), Environmental Site Assessment, mitigation measures and Environmental Management Systems.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Understand requirements, regulatory framework, stages, stakeholders and procedures of an EIA study.
    • Perform basic environmental assessment techniques, such as soil and water testing.
    • Apply appropriate techniques, computational tools, and data for impact identification, evaluation and prediction.
    • Create a preliminary EIA report.
    • Explain their EIA study to an audience that represents group of stakeholders.

901552 Advance Water Treatment Technique               (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 901453 Wastewater Treatment Engineering

  • This course covers the fundamental concepts, principles, and techniques related advanced wastewater treatment engineering.
  • Topics include: SS removal, membrane filter, ion exchange, design and operation of tertiary treatment, solid waste handling, management and maintenance of treatment plants, reverse osmosis, toxic substance removal, biological nitrification and denitrification, water reuse and sustainability and carbon footprint for treatment systems.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Identify special pollutants and select appropriate treatment units.
    • Apply design equation to size different types of advanced treatment units.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of sustainability and carbon footprint consideration for water and wastewater systems.

901559 Advanced Topics in Environmental Engineering  (3 Credit Hours)

Co-requisite: 901456 Environmental Engineering

  • This course focuses on the integration of science and engineering principles to improve the natural environment and provide healthy water, air, and land for habitation.
  • Topics include; Remote sensing applications in environmental studies, Sustainability Principles, Introduction to EIA studies and reporting, Green Engineering Principles and LEED.

901561 Advanced Engineering Surveying                      (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 901204 (901261) Engineering Surveying

  • This course focuses on advanced topics in engineering surveying.
  • Topics include; Remote sensing applications in different engineering studies. Covering subjects related to GPS that are needed to understand and use GPS as a land surveyor including the basics of GPS technology.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Implement remote sensing and GPS in engineering studies and applications.

901562 Surveying Techniques                                        (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 901204 (901261) Engineering Surveying

  • This course covers selective topics in surveying techniques.
  • Topics include: An introduction on Geographic Information System (GIS). Global Positioning System (GPS); GPS positioning methods, GPS solutions and errors, GPS application. Introduction to Remote Sensing (RS); Electromagnetic spectrum, Sensors and platform, image interpretation.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • Use GIS concepts in data input.
    • Be able to make use of different GPS applications.
    • Be able to apply remote sensing applications.

901572 Construction Project Planning & Scheduling    (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: 901471 Construction Project Management

  • This course covers the fundamental concepts in Construction Project Management, Cost Management, Quality Management, Safety Management, Human Resource Management, Planning and Scheduling, Monitoring and Controlling of Performance, Value Engineering and Construction Process Optimization, Using Primavera software.
  • At the end of this course, students should be able to:
    • An ability to perform construction project cost analysis, project planning and scheduling, and project monitoring.
    • Work effectively in teams to demonstrate technical abilities and well-rounded acquired experience.

901581 Special Topics in Civil Engineering (1)             (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: Dep. Approval

  • The course description of this course is upon the approval of the department where the lecturer needs to submit the course description as well as the course syllabus to the chairperson in order to approve it by the departmental council.

901582 Special Topics in Civil Engineering (2)             (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-requisite: Dep. Approval

  • The course description of this course is upon the approval of the department where the lecturer needs to submit the course description as well as the course syllabus to the chairperson in order to approve it by the departmental council.
Department Chair's Message, Prof. Khaled Ramadan

Department Chair
Dear students of the Department of Civil Engineering Peace, God's mercy and blessings be upon you, I congratulate you for choosing to study the specialization of ...
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